The death of the mouth and other essays summary

How would you define it in the spectrum of the Hong Kong media? For some, independence means taking no stance. Many media organisations have leaned towards Beijing, while some have become the voice of the government.

The death of the mouth and other essays summary

The Death of the Moth, and other essays, by Virginia Woolf The Death of the Moth Moths that fly by day are not properly to be called moths; they do not excite that pleasant sense of dark autumn nights and ivy-blossom which the commonest yellow-underwing asleep in the shadow of the curtain never fails to rouse in us.

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They are hybrid creatures, neither gay like butterflies nor sombre like their own species. Nevertheless the present specimen, with his narrow hay-coloured wings, fringed with a tassel of the same colour, seemed to be content with life. It was a pleasant morning, mid—September, mild, benignant, yet with a keener breath than that of the summer months.

The plough was already scoring the field opposite the window, and where the share had been, the earth was pressed flat and gleamed with moisture. Such vigour came rolling in from the fields and the down beyond that it was difficult to keep the eyes strictly turned upon the book.

The rooks too were keeping one of their annual festivities; soaring round the tree tops until it looked as if a vast net with thousands of black knots in it had been cast up into the air; which, after a few moments sank slowly down upon the trees until every twig seemed to have a knot at the end of it.

Then, suddenly, the net would be thrown into the air again in a wider circle this time, with the utmost clamour and vociferation, as though to be thrown into the air and settle slowly down upon the tree tops were a tremendously exciting experience.

The same energy which inspired the rooks, the ploughmen, the horses, and even, it seemed, the lean bare-backed downs, sent the moth fluttering from side to side of his square of the window-pane.

The death of the mouth and other essays summary

One could not help watching him. One was, indeed, conscious of a queer feeling of pity for him.

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He flew vigorously to one corner of his compartment, and, after waiting there a second, flew across to the other. What remained for him but to fly to a third corner and then to a fourth?

That was all he could do, in spite of the size of the downs, the width of the sky, the far-off smoke of houses, and the romantic voice, now and then, of a steamer out at sea. What he could do he did. Watching him, it seemed as if a fibre, very thin but pure, of the enormous energy of the world had been thrust into his frail and diminutive body.

As often as he crossed the pane, I could fancy that a thread of vital light became visible. He was little or nothing but life. Yet, because he was so small, and so simple a form of the energy that was rolling in at the open window and driving its way through so many narrow and intricate corridors in my own brain and in those of other human beings, there was something marvellous as well as pathetic about him.

It was as if someone had taken a tiny bead of pure life and decking it as lightly as possible with down and feathers, had set it dancing and zig-zagging to show us the true nature of life.

Thus displayed one could not get over the strangeness of it. One is apt to forget all about life, seeing it humped and bossed and garnished and cumbered so that it has to move with the greatest circumspection and dignity.

Again, the thought of all that life might have been had he been born in any other shape caused one to view his simple activities with a kind of pity. After a time, tired by his dancing apparently, he settled on the window ledge in the sun, and, the queer spectacle being at an end, I forgot about him.

Then, looking up, my eye was caught by him. He was trying to resume his dancing, but seemed either so stiff or so awkward that he could only flutter to the bottom of the window-pane; and when he tried to fly across it he failed.

Being intent on other matters I watched these futile attempts for a time without thinking, unconsciously waiting for him to resume his flight, as one waits for a machine, that has stopped momentarily, to start again without considering the reason of its failure.

After perhaps a seventh attempt he slipped from the wooden ledge and fell, fluttering his wings, on to his back on the window sill.The body relaxed, and instantly grew stiff.

The struggle was over.

The death of the mouth and other essays summary

The insignificant little creature now knew death. As I looked at the dead moth, this minute wayside triumph of so great a force over so mean an antagonist filled me with wonder.

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In "Death of a Moth" by Virginia Woolf, Woolf compares the wonder of life and death by using a moth as an example of the simplicity of life and death and the need to accept the inevitable. The Death of the Moth, and Other Essays, by Virginia Woolf, free ebook. Download Peter Pan Study Guide Subscribe now to download this study guide, along with more than 30, other titles.

Get help with any book. Download PDF Summary (Critical Survey of Literature for. This one-page guide includes a plot summary and brief analysis of After The First Death by Robert Cormier.

American author Robert Cormier’s young adult novel, After the First Death, tells the story of a bus carrying five-year-old children to a summer day camp that is taken over by terrorists. Kate, a high school student, is driving the bus when the incident begins.

The Death of the Moth, and other essays, by Virginia Woolf : chapter1