How to write a fight scene with swords

Happily, there are a few devices you can use to ensure you write the kind of fight scene that grips a reader from start to finish. Let the reader choreograph your fight scene. This is their time to shine. Pace Intensifying the pace of your writing can communicate the immediacy and suddenness of conflict.

How to write a fight scene with swords

There are various elements that make up a great story—plot, story development, character growth, depth. All of these contribute to turning a good story into a great story.

However, one more element that can spice up your story is a good action scene. But how do you write a good action scene? Here are five tips to get you started….

Photo by Kelly Bailey 1. Brandon Sanderson perfectly executed each one of the action scenes in his books and believe me, there are a lot of them. If you want to study good action scenes, check out his books.

Take time to make readers care for your characters. Develop them so when the action scene finally comes, your readers will care enough about the characters to want to know what happens. Getting your readers emotionally involved is key to keeping them entertained.

If you, the writer, cannot visualize the fight, expect the readers to have trouble as well. Visualize how each moment of the scenes will take place. Try writing multiple ways of how the scene plays out.

Ask other people to read them out. Did they like what they read? Were they able to picture out a clear image of the fight? They can also be about your protagonist trying to race against time to stop a time bomb. But they always must be clearly written. Spice up your verbs. Verbs are the bread and butter of every action scene.

After all, action scenes need action words. Whenever I write action scenes, I make it a point to make use of the thesaurus. The two swords clanged against each other. Barbaros shouted as he spun around and swung his sword sideways.

Luka deflected the blow with his shield. Barbaros lost his footing. Luka saw the opening. One way of speeding up the pace of your story is by shortening the sentences.

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Longer sentences tend to slow down the momentum of the action. Another tip is to avoid using long descriptions. Use descriptions only if they are related to the action, otherwise completely abandon them.Writing realistic fight scenes can feel like being in one.

Then again, being in a fight involves reaction, quick thinking, and intuition. A lot of times writing the scene takes the opposite: careful choreography, thinking, and re-thinking–and more. Conclusion. I hope this will help anyone who is writing a sword fight scene to be able to proceed with confidence.

If you find that you are still uncomfortable writing a sword fight, there are many guides to traditional sword fighting you may consult, though be warned: many contain gory sketches. Jun 09,  · First, you use "beautiful sword fighting scene", then "brutal combat scenes".

how to write a fight scene with swords

That tells me that you find blood and guts beautiful. The suggestion for dialogue would be for other people's view of beauty, but for brutality, you would want to describe the various wounds, agony, deaths, blood, and so forth. Sample Swordfight Scene.

End of the line. One last stop. Though he’d heard it described as “underground,” Davis was loath to call the last round of the fight anything close to that since it took place on the roof of a building.

Sep 15,  · I would suggest you imagine the fight in your head first. Understand each movement the fighters make towards the outcome of the fight.

how to write a fight scene with swords

Swords are slashing weapons prdominantly. Just deside what style your fighters would use its like hand to hand in that way.

Fencing is a style. As is Tai Chi. IV. Remember these words when it comes to writing fight scenes in general: Dodging, swiping, stabbing, slashing, and bleeding. Usually, the large person with the sword gets clobbered by the little swift guy with the stick, or vice-versa.

J. R. Tomlin on Writing and More: Writing a Believable Sword Fight Scene (Part II)